relativism reigns here


6 notes

tingender:

Ihr Lieben,

wie einige von euch bereits wissen, habe ich das Hobby, mich ueber Prominente auf dem Laufenden zu halten. Doch selbst bei solch einer simplen & harmlosen Beschaeftigung wird man nicht davor bewahrt, mit stupidem, braunem & sexistischem Gedankengut konfrontiert zu werden. Um das irgendwie kompensieren zu koennen, habe ich nun einen neuen Blog gegruendet, der das Beste aus taeglichen Promiflash-Kommentaren darstellt. E-mails an die Betreiber der Seite mit Beschwerden ueber gewisse Aussagen werden uebrigens gewissenhaft ignoriert. Vielleicht aendert sich ja etwas in Zukunft.

Spread the word!

6 notes

Ihr Lieben,

wie einige von euch bereits wissen, habe ich das Hobby, mich ueber Prominente auf dem Laufenden zu halten. Doch selbst bei solch einer simplen & harmlosen Beschaeftigung wird man nicht davor bewahrt, mit stupidem, braunem & sexistischem Gedankengut konfrontiert zu werden. Um das irgendwie kompensieren zu koennen, habe ich nun einen neuen Blog gegruendet, der das Beste aus taeglichen Promiflash-Kommentaren darstellt. E-mails an die Betreiber der Seite mit Beschwerden ueber gewisse Aussagen werden uebrigens gewissenhaft ignoriert. Vielleicht aendert sich ja etwas in Zukunft.

Spread the word!

50,294 notes theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]
563 notes "I sometimes worry that serious music can only be served by serious talk, or worse, that people who like serious music can only have serious reasons for doing so. The truth is that you will probably meet just as many shallow people at a National show as you will at a Miley Cyrus show, the difference being that people at the National show are more likely to think they’re important, while people at a Miley Cyrus show are more likely to think they’re having fun." — Mike Powell talks about what we mean when we talk about pop music with his Pitch piece "It’s Not What You Like But How You Like It". (via pitchfork)

(via lalalaetc)

1,710 notes snes-sexcult:

Christopher Owens.
828 notes
173,411 notes a-squalor-victoria:

rendigo:

tastefullyoffensive:

"She never thought the toilet paper roll would fight back." [jesst]

whatwhat are ferrets even MADE of?????

I don’t think there is a day where I won’t reblog this.
2 notes

I don’t like Kirsten Dunst anymore because she said “women should behave like women to make a relationship work” & “actresses who are sleeping with someone for a role are asking for it”.

212 notes kawaiigod:

parents are a touchy subject
84 notes internetgrl:

sandy kim
11,662 notes "we can recognize that police brutality is bad in like dystopian novels like the hunger games for example people recognize that the peacekeepers are an oppressive force but when its happening in real life to real people its always “not all cops are bad” because they only target people our society doesnt view as fully human like people of color, trans people, disabled people, poor people, and sex workers" — J’en parlerai à mon cheval

(Source: slugzone)

647 notes
62,753 notes "i want boys to like me so i can not like them back and feel powerful" — *egg noise*
132 notes
11,190 notes
Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prison - March 14, 2014

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.

Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.

Full article

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via tablepunk)